About the author
Sources
Sources

[1] Udoh M, Santiago M, Devenish S, McGregor IS, Connor M. Cannabichromene is a cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist. British journal of pharmacology. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6932936/. Published December 2019. Accessed November 2, 2021. [Source]

[2] Rosenbaum T. TRPV1 receptors and signal transduction. TRP Ion Channel Function in Sensory Transduction and Cellular Signaling Cascades. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK5260/. Published January 1, 1970. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[3] Marcu J. (PDF) an overview of major and minor phytocannabinoids. ResearchGate. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304804387_An_Overview_of_Major_and_Minor_Phytocannabinoids. Published 2016. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[4] Ligresti A, Moriello AS, Starowicz K, et al. Antitumor activity of plant cannabinoids with emphasis on the effect of cannabidiol on human breast carcinoma. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. https://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/318/3/1375. Published September 1, 2006. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[5] Nakajima J, Nakae D, Yasukawa K. Structure‐dependent inhibitory effects of synthetic cannabinoids against 12‐O‐tetradecanoylphorbol‐13‐acetate‐induced inflammation and skin tumour promotion in mice. Wiley Online Library. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jphp.12082. Published May 21, 2013. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[6] Oláh A;Markovics A;Szabó-Papp J;Szabó PT;Stott C;Zouboulis CC;Bíró T; A. Differential effectiveness of selected non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids on human Sebocyte functions implicates their introduction in dry/seborrhoeic skin and acne treatment. Experimental dermatology. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27094344/. Published 2016. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[7] El-Alfy AT;Ivey K;Robinson K;Ahmed S;Radwan M;Slade D;Khan I;ElSohly M;Ross S; A. Antidepressant-like effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis Sativa L. Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20332000/. Published 2010. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[8] Izzo AA;Capasso R;Aviello G;Borrelli F;Romano B;Piscitelli F;Gallo L;Capasso F;Orlando P;Di Marzo V; A. Inhibitory effect of cannabichromene, a major non-psychotropic cannabinoid extracted from cannabis sativa, on inflammation-induced hypermotility in mice. British journal of pharmacology. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22300105/. Published 2012. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

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CBC: Everything You Need To Know

CBC: Everything You Need To Know

Cannabichromene, or CBC, is the third most abundant cannabinoid in hemp. And although it may not get as much attention as more popular cannabinoids, CBC is non-intoxicating and shows a ton of wellness potential. To find out what you need to know about this essential cannabinoid, keep reading.

What is CBC?

CBC is one of over a hundred different cannabinoids found in hemp and other Cannabis sativa L. family members. Discovered over fifty years ago, it’s the third most common compound, alongside its siblings CBD (2nd) and THC (1st).

Cannabichromene appears to have some interesting interactions with the human body, different to that of other non-toxic cannabinoids. However, we use the word “appears” because we don’t know that much about CBC. Not because it’s unsafe or prohibited, but because it’s difficult to isolate.

As hemp grows, CBGA, the “mother cannabinoid”, undergoes chemical changes to become cannabinoids such as CBC and CBD. The scarcity of specific cannabinoids, especially in mature plants, makes it difficult for researchers to explore their potential fully, and is part of the reason there’s still a lot to learn about CBC.

Fortunately, interest in cannabinoids in general is increasing. As more evidence shows that the wellness potential of hemp hinges on a full spectrum of compounds, as opposed to just one in isolation, the focus is slowly shifting to smaller but equally important cannabinoids such as CBC.

What’s the difference between CBC and CBD?

Having briefly mentioned CBD, it makes sense to examine how CBC stacks up against its more dominant counterpart. To start, let’s consider the similarities:

• Non-toxic
• Exhibit few side effects
• Interact with the human body mainly via the endocannabinoid system (ECS)

However, despite both interfacing with the ECS, CBD plays more of a general role in well-being, helping to modulate the efficiency of receptors spread all over the body, whereas CBC takes a more direct approach.

Cannabichromene shows a strong affinity for CB2 and TRPV1 receptors. The former is one of the two primary cannabinoid receptor types and helps to modulate functions such as inflammation, while the latter is considered part of the "expanded endocannabinoid system" and supports regulation of sensations including heat and pain.

CBC and the entourage effect

What’s also notable about CBD and CBC is their ability to work together, and the benefit this interaction provides. All cannabinoids are believed to engage in a unique interaction called the entourage effect. It may sound complex, but the term simply means that their respective abilities are enhanced when working together.

Not only could a combination of CBD and CBC address different needs in the body, but it could make the overall effect even stronger. This intriguing interaction is the primary reason that leading CBD manufacturers (Cibdol included) use a full spectrum of cannabinoids in their oils, capsules, and supplements. In essence, cannabinoids appear to be the epitome of the phrase “many hands make light work”.

How does CBC work?

As we highlighted earlier, it appears that the primary mechanism of action for CBC is via the endocannabinoid system, specifically CB2 receptors and TRPV1 receptors.

Before diving into the specifics of the receptors outlined above, let's review the overarching system responsible for most interactions between cannabinoids and the human body. The endocannabinoid system (ECS for short) is a vast network found inside the body, stretching from head to toe.

The purpose of the ECS is to monitor the function of other biological systems. By keeping a close eye on our immune system, central nervous system, skin, and more, the ECS works to maintain a state of balance. When all of our systems are balanced and have their needs met, we feel at our best.

Throughout the ECS, at critical locations, are receptors—aptly titled cannabinoid receptors. These receptors are a way for compounds to interact with the ECS to prompt changes. If the ECS detects a problem, CB receptors (CB1 and CB2) are an entry point for cannabinoids to help restore the body to its most efficient state.

CB receptors

A review by the British Journal of Pharmacology found that CBC is primarily a CB2 agonist, showing little if any affinity for CB1 receptors.[1] This distinction is important because of the different functions that CB receptors oversee. Activating CB1 receptors in the brain causes psychotropic side effects, while CB2 receptors are mostly linked to modulation of the immune system and select parts of the central nervous system.

However, it’s important to highlight that knowing an interaction exists is only one piece of the puzzle. At present, researchers don’t know exactly how to use that interaction to benefit human health. There are a few preliminary findings (which we’ll explain shortly), but there is still a lot to learn.

TRP receptors

The second notable interaction is with TRPV1 receptors, although this is a little more nuanced. Essentially, TRP receptors act as signalling stations involved in sensations such as heat and pain.[2] The TRPV1 receptor, for example, is the “only one activated by capsaicin, the compound inside chilli peppers responsible for its 'hot taste'". Activating or inhibiting said receptors can trigger certain signals and change the way the body reacts to stimuli.

What researchers have discovered so far is that CBC can “significantly interact with TRP channels”, which may influence how the human body perceives pain.[3] However, with so many factors involved, there’s much more still to uncover about this interaction.

What Are the Effects of CBC?

CBC may only be the third most abundant cannabinoid inside hemp, but that doesn’t mean it lacks the potential to positively impact how we think and feel. Preliminary studies into CBC point to some meaningful interactions, which, most importantly, come with an apparent lack of side effects. Here are some areas in which CBC is currently being probed for its potential:

• Cancer: Researchers examined CBC and CBD for their antitumour potential in human breast carcinoma in 2006,[4] and a 2013 study sought to determine the effectiveness of cannabinoids against carcinogenesis in mice.[5]

• Acne: An in-vitro study from 2016 found CBC and CBDV to help suppress sebum production from overactive sebaceous glands.[6] A buildup of sebum blocks the pores and can lead to acne.

• Depression: A 2010 study from the University of Mississippi tested the antidepressant-like potential of numerous cannabinoids in a mouse model, finding CBC and CBD to display some of the most intriguing outcomes.[7]

• Inflammation: CBC was found to influence the inflammatory response in the small intestine of mice as part of a 2012 study. Interestingly, the effect was not dependent on CB or TRPV1 receptors, which could point to a third, undiscovered mechanism of action.[8]

Given the age and preliminary nature of these studies, we obviously cannot make concrete statements on CBC's efficacy for specific conditions, but the results of this scientific inquiry have only heightened interest in CBC's holistic potential. As CBC undergoes more in-depth study, we'll be able to assess its potential with greater accuracy.

What CBC products are there?

With an introduction to CBC covered, it’s time to look at using the cannabinoid as part of a wellness routine. The good news is that a growing array of products include CBC; the bad news is that few focus solely on cannabichromene.

Although present in mature hemp plants, levels of CBC are pretty low. Considerably more raw plant material is needed to produce CBC oils in the same concentration as traditional cannabinoid products. Unfortunately, this means a much greater cost to the producer and the consumer.

However, one of the best ways to enjoy CBC (while also benefitting from the entourage effect) is to use full-spectrum products, such as:

• CBD oils
• CBD capsules
• CBD gummies

At Cibdol, we independently test all batches of our full-spectrum extract—first and foremost so our customers can verify the contents of our products, and second so we can display the ratio of smaller cannabinoids like CBC. With so much untapped potential, including cannabichromene in other cannabinoid formulas could prove pivotal to the happy and balanced lifestyle we all crave.

If you want to explore the potential of CBC, why not browse the Cibdol store for a complete selection of full-spectrum oils, capsules, and supplements. Or, if you’re fascinated by the origins of cannabinoids, visit our CBD Encyclopedia for everything you need to know.

FAQ

Is CBC the same as CBD?
CBC shares some similarities with CBD, but it is a different cannabinoid with a unique influence on the human body.
Is CBC legal?
You should always check local restrictions, but CBC is non-intoxicating and isn’t prohibited by the UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs.
What is CBC oil?
CBC oil harnesses the wellness potential of cannabichromene, but high-quality full-spectrum CBD oils should also include CBC

Sources

[1] Udoh M, Santiago M, Devenish S, McGregor IS, Connor M. Cannabichromene is a cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist. British journal of pharmacology. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6932936/. Published December 2019. Accessed November 2, 2021. [Source]

[2] Rosenbaum T. TRPV1 receptors and signal transduction. TRP Ion Channel Function in Sensory Transduction and Cellular Signaling Cascades. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK5260/. Published January 1, 1970. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[3] Marcu J. (PDF) an overview of major and minor phytocannabinoids. ResearchGate. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304804387_An_Overview_of_Major_and_Minor_Phytocannabinoids. Published 2016. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[4] Ligresti A, Moriello AS, Starowicz K, et al. Antitumor activity of plant cannabinoids with emphasis on the effect of cannabidiol on human breast carcinoma. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. https://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/318/3/1375. Published September 1, 2006. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[5] Nakajima J, Nakae D, Yasukawa K. Structure‐dependent inhibitory effects of synthetic cannabinoids against 12‐O‐tetradecanoylphorbol‐13‐acetate‐induced inflammation and skin tumour promotion in mice. Wiley Online Library. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jphp.12082. Published May 21, 2013. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[6] Oláh A;Markovics A;Szabó-Papp J;Szabó PT;Stott C;Zouboulis CC;Bíró T; A. Differential effectiveness of selected non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids on human Sebocyte functions implicates their introduction in dry/seborrhoeic skin and acne treatment. Experimental dermatology. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27094344/. Published 2016. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[7] El-Alfy AT;Ivey K;Robinson K;Ahmed S;Radwan M;Slade D;Khan I;ElSohly M;Ross S; A. Antidepressant-like effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis Sativa L. Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20332000/. Published 2010. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[8] Izzo AA;Capasso R;Aviello G;Borrelli F;Romano B;Piscitelli F;Gallo L;Capasso F;Orlando P;Di Marzo V; A. Inhibitory effect of cannabichromene, a major non-psychotropic cannabinoid extracted from cannabis sativa, on inflammation-induced hypermotility in mice. British journal of pharmacology. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22300105/. Published 2012. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

Author
Luke Sholl

Title/author.

Luke Sholl
With over a decade of experience writing about CBD and cannabinoids, Luke is an established journalist working as the lead writer for Cibdol and other cannabinoid publications. Committed to presenting factual, evidence-based content, his fascination with CBD also extends to fitness, nutrition, and disease prevention.
Luke Sholl

Title/author.

Luke Sholl
With over a decade of experience writing about CBD and cannabinoids, Luke is an established journalist working as the lead writer for Cibdol and other cannabinoid publications. Committed to presenting factual, evidence-based content, his fascination with CBD also extends to fitness, nutrition, and disease prevention.
Sources

[1] Udoh M, Santiago M, Devenish S, McGregor IS, Connor M. Cannabichromene is a cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist. British journal of pharmacology. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6932936/. Published December 2019. Accessed November 2, 2021. [Source]

[2] Rosenbaum T. TRPV1 receptors and signal transduction. TRP Ion Channel Function in Sensory Transduction and Cellular Signaling Cascades. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK5260/. Published January 1, 1970. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[3] Marcu J. (PDF) an overview of major and minor phytocannabinoids. ResearchGate. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/304804387_An_Overview_of_Major_and_Minor_Phytocannabinoids. Published 2016. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[4] Ligresti A, Moriello AS, Starowicz K, et al. Antitumor activity of plant cannabinoids with emphasis on the effect of cannabidiol on human breast carcinoma. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. https://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/318/3/1375. Published September 1, 2006. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[5] Nakajima J, Nakae D, Yasukawa K. Structure‐dependent inhibitory effects of synthetic cannabinoids against 12‐O‐tetradecanoylphorbol‐13‐acetate‐induced inflammation and skin tumour promotion in mice. Wiley Online Library. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jphp.12082. Published May 21, 2013. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[6] Oláh A;Markovics A;Szabó-Papp J;Szabó PT;Stott C;Zouboulis CC;Bíró T; A. Differential effectiveness of selected non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids on human Sebocyte functions implicates their introduction in dry/seborrhoeic skin and acne treatment. Experimental dermatology. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27094344/. Published 2016. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[7] El-Alfy AT;Ivey K;Robinson K;Ahmed S;Radwan M;Slade D;Khan I;ElSohly M;Ross S; A. Antidepressant-like effect of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis Sativa L. Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20332000/. Published 2010. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

[8] Izzo AA;Capasso R;Aviello G;Borrelli F;Romano B;Piscitelli F;Gallo L;Capasso F;Orlando P;Di Marzo V; A. Inhibitory effect of cannabichromene, a major non-psychotropic cannabinoid extracted from cannabis sativa, on inflammation-induced hypermotility in mice. British journal of pharmacology. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22300105/. Published 2012. Accessed November 3, 2021. [Source]

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